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CRPS Resources

Looking to learn more about CRPS? There are many great resources with very valuable information.  Be sure to check out the following:

 

American RSD Hope

http://www.rsdhope.org/

 

Color the World Orange

http://www.colortheworldorange.com/#ctwo

 

NIH Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Fact Sheet

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/reflex_sympathetic_dystrophy/detail_reflex_sympathetic_dystrophy.htm

 

RSDSA

http://rsds.org/

 

If you think you or a loved one are suffering from CRPS, give Pain Specialists of Charleston a call today to make an appointment: 843-818-1181! OR Visit Our Website!

 

Speaking to Someone with an Invisible Illness

CRPS is considered an “invisible illness”. This means that those suffering from the disease may look completely fine and healthy on the outside.  It can be very difficult for others to understand exactly what CRPS patients are going through and why they may be “different” than before.

People who are close to someone with CRPS or other invisible illnesses may struggle to find the right words with which to comfort their loved one. Molly’s Fund, which raises funds and awareness for Lupus (another invisible illness) posted this wonderful list of 10 things NOT to say to someone with an invisible illness:

  1. “You have what? I’ve never heard of it.”
  2. “You need to exercise more.”
  3. “Aren’t you feeling better yet?”
  4. “Maybe an anti-depressant would help.”
  5. “But you look just fine.” or “You don’t look sick.”
  6. “You are taking too much medicine.”
  7. “You need to change your diet.”
  8. “It’s all in your head.”
  9. “Losing weight might help.”
  10. “If you just had a more positive attitude.”

 

Instead, Molly’s Fund encourages people to choose phrases such as:

  1. “How are you doing today?”
  2. “Is there anything I can do to make things easier?”
  3. “I am here for you, whatever you need.”
  4. “It must be very difficult to have a disease where you feel so awful on the inside but it doesn’t show on the outside.”
  5. “I am so sorry that you are going through this.”
  6. “I wish I could take your pain away.”
  7. “I hope you are feeling better soon.”
  8. “I will keep you in my thoughts and prayers.”
  9. “I may not completely understand your disease or what you’re going through, but I would like to.”
  10. “I am so sorry I judged you before understanding your disease.”

 

If you think you or a loved one are suffering from CRPS, give Pain Specialists of Charleston a call today to make an appointment: 843-818-1181! OR Visit Our Website!

 

 

Coping with CRPS

A CRPS diagnosis can be incredibly frustrating to patients. Not only do they have to deal with chronic severe pain, but they also often feel isolated, angry, and stressed.  However, many CRPS patients learn to cope with the disease and go on to live happy, fulfilled lives.

Paired with treatment options that are best for the individual patient, here are just some of the ways to make living with CRPS a bit easier to manage:

-Keep moving. Yoga, tai chi, and other gentle exercise can be very beneficial.

-Pace yourself. It’s important to continue to go about your everyday activities to the best of your ability. Break up large tasks into several smaller tasks to make them less daunting and help you save your energy.

-Distract yourself. Take up a hobby to help keep your mind off the pain.

-Join a support group. There are many groups available that communicate online or meet in person.

If you think you or a loved one are suffering from CRPS, give Pain Specialists of Charleston a call today to make an appointment: 843-818-1181! OR Visit Our Website!

CRPS 101

Did you know that today is “Color the World Orange Day”?  Color The World Orange is an event held the first Monday of November each year to spread awareness of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), also known as Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy.

 

What is CRPS?

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, also known as Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, is characterized by severe chronic pain that usually begins after an injury, surgery, or other physically traumatic event. The severe pain continues even after the original injury has healed.

Symptoms of CRPS include, but are not limited to:

-Severe pain that can be described as burning, deep, aching, or pins and needles

-Difficulty moving the affected body part

-Extreme skin sensitivity

-Changes to skin color, texture, and temperature around the affected area

-Abnormal hair and nail growth

-Abnormal sweating

 

Which part of the body is affected by CRPS?

Typically this disease affects the arms, legs, hands, or feet. However, the pain can spread to other parts of the body that were not originally injured.

 

Who is affected by CRPS?

Although anyone can get CRPS, it occurs much more frequently in women than in men. The average age of people affected by this disease is about 40, but it can also affect teenagers.

 

How is CRPS diagnosed?

There is no specific test to diagnose CRPS. Instead, doctors take into account a patient’s symptoms and medical history.  They may also test to rule out other conditions.  Early diagnosis is important because even though it varies patient to patient, typically patients who are diagnosed and treated early have a better recovery.

 

What treatment options are available?

Patients with CRPS have found success with several different treatment options. Treatment may include:

-Physical therapy

-Medications

-Nerve blocks

-Spinal cord stimulation

-Alternative therapy such as chiropractic treatment

-Psychotherapy

 

If you think you or a loved one are suffering from CRPS, give Pain Specialists of Charleston a call today to make an appointment: 843-818-1181! OR Visit Our Website!

 

Tips On Using Knee Brace For Knee Pain

Did you know the knee is the largest joint in the human body? It is important to keep your knees well kept because over time, even the strongest joints will begin to break down.

Sprains can happen to anyone, it is when the muscles which connect the bones together are strained. Second and third degree sprains are the worst of them all, these ligaments are actually torn. Healing could take weeks and physical therapy.

In addition to knee pain, there are other signs you can tell your knees are having trouble:

  • Swelling
  • Inability to Walk
  • The Sound of Grating
  • Numbing
  • Discoloration

But even though you have plenty of options for dealing with knee pain, perhaps the most practical solution is a good knee brace. And although they do have their limits, using them is indispensable if you want to prevent further damage to your knees.

Utilizing medical knee braces in combination with other knee pain treatments is the fastest way to treat your joint pain and get back to health. The best thing about knee braces as a treatment is that they are fairly simple and easy to use. Knee pain and arthritis are problems which happen to almost everyone in their life, but with the help of a knee brace it can make the treatment easier.

Pain Specialists of Charleston offers knee braces through our DME department here in our office. Ask your medical provider if you are interested in adding a knee brace to your treatment.